LadyCADE & “Mimic” at GameCity 9

Modus OperandiNottingham’s GameCity is a singularly special event in my annual games culture calendar. This year, as the festival also announced its new and permanent home in the city, I threw myself into co-hosting two events for LadyCADE’s first anniversary, as well as helping to show Mimic and experiencing a little of the festival myself.

I was also interviewed for The Guardian on the Monday, and spoke about what I was up to there:

As the rest of my GameCity experience covered show much ground, I’ve opted to return to a photoblog format for this recap. More past the cut!

LadyCADE Showcase

Mon 27th Oct, afternoon:
LadyCADE took over gallery 1 in the Open Arcade, with a low-key but vibrant showcase of games made by women.

"Mimic" at LadyCADE

Daniel Nyberg shows “Mimic” while other players enjoy “Tengami” (far left), “Mushroom 11”, “PixelPics” and “Robin Hood” on SNES (far right)

LadyCADE Showcase

Exhibitor Fiona Burrows (“PixelPics”) with visitor Barry Hemans. “Mushroom 11” runs in the foreground.

LadyCADE Evening Social

Mon 27th, evening:
We departed GameCity at close of the Open Arcade for food, in typical ad-hoc, GameCity style. It is during this time that a reporter from The Nottingham Post turned up to report on the event, but fortunately exhibitor Ana Ribeiro was on-hand to be interviewed.

An assortment of LadyCADE exhibitors and attendees at Annie's Burger Shack in Nottingham

We, the organisers, along with an assortment of LadyCADE exhibitors and attendees at Annie’s Burger Shack in Nottingham.

The evening social in full swing, with Sophie Houlden's "Bang Bang Bang!" providing ample entertainment.

The evening social in full swing, with Sophie Houlden’s “Bang Bang Bang!” providing ample entertainment.

Mimic at GameCity 9’s Open Arcade

Tuesday 28th Oct, daytime:
Mimic formally joined the GameCity Open Arcade on Tuesday, with a host of new faces and returning players eager to try their hand at deception and hunting in a crowd.

"Mimic" at GameCity 9 "Mimic" at GameCity 9 "Mimic" at GameCity 9

Around GameCity

Tuesday to Thursday, 28th-30th Oct:
This was our opportunity to enjoy the festival more, in great company and with more license to relax. I ended up packing quite a few panel items into my Wednesday – to borrow convention terminology. The highlight of this was Christos Reid and Zoe Quinn’s thought-provoking conversation and shared wisdom, on developing auto-biographical games.

The "King Billy", to which we decanted most nights during GameCity.

The “King Billy”, to which we decanted most nights during GameCity.

One of Nottingham's mysterious, laser-cut plastic rabbits lurks in plain sight between Kai Oliver and Ed Key, in the "King Billy"'s function room.

One of Nottingham’s mysterious, laser-cut plastic rabbits lurks in plain sight, in the “King Billy”‘s function room. Kai (right) suggested that he take one back to London; I then resolved to bring one to Sweden, and thus an attempt to spread GameCity joy internationally was born.

Station-spotting in "Lumino City", as State of Plays exhibition model

Station-spotting in “Lumino City”, as State of Play’s exhibition model included details such as this London Underground-inspired transit hub.

Christos Reid and Zoe Quinn discuss the challenges and benefits of creating games to describe personal experiences.

Christos Reid and Zoe Quinn discuss the challenges and benefits of creating games to describe personal experiences.

The GameCity Prize is awarded to Lucas Popes "Papers Please"

The GameCity Prize is awarded to Lucas Pope’s “Papers, Please”

An impromptu pool night at the King William IV pub. Daniel and Is match didnt quite match up to

An impromptu pool night at the King William IV pub, following on from delicious south Indian food.

Finally, I ended Thursday by attending a sofa interview with Prof. Richard Bartle, creator of "MUD". He was kind enough to bear my enthusiasm for the medium he effectively created - and to which I personally owe a great deal.

Finally, I ended Thursday by attending a sofa interview with Prof. Richard Bartle, creator of “MUD”. He was kind enough to bear my enthusiasm for the medium he effectively created – and to which I personally owe a great deal.

Links